Voices of the First Day: Awakening in the Aboriginal Dreamtime by Robert Lawlor

An Excerpt from Voices of the First Day: Awakening In the Aboriginal Dreamtime by Robert Lawlor

Robert Lawlor explores the rich legacy of Aboriginals to the world. Here is an excerpt on meaning.

“The earth holds an infinite profusion of seeds. Seeds contain forms and worlds yet to germinate; the roots, leaves, and flowers of the entire plant are invisibly enclosed in the seed. Paradoxically, the unborn potential of future life is fused, within a seed, to primordial patterns that were laid down in the very beginning. The seed’s capacity to engender new life seems to derive from the imprint of patterns carried through the ages.

“This image of the earth with its seeds is comparable to Carl Jung’s description of humanity’s collective unconscious: both hold the entire heritage of primal patterns that are continually reborn through nature’s seasons. Like seeds, myths, ideas, and images are dispersed throughout the world on the winds of thought, the waters of emotion, and the fires of passion.

“The Australian Aborigines speak of jiva or guruwari, a ‘seed power’ deposited in the earth. In the Aboriginal world view, every meaningful activity, event, or life process that occurs at a particular place leaves behind a vibrational residue in the earth, as plants leave an image of themselves as seeds. The shape of the land — its mountains, rocks, riverbeds, and waterholes — and its unseen vibrations echo the events that brought that place into creation. Everything in the natural world is a symbolic footprint of the metaphysical beings whose actions created our world. As with a seed, the potency of an earthly location is wedded to the memory of its origin. The Aborigines called this potency the ‘Dreaming’ of’ a place, and this Dreaming constitutes the sacredness of the earth. Only in extraordinary states of consciousness can one be aware of, or attuned to, the inner dreaming of the earth.

Lawlor explains that these people have grounded their culture in remembrance of “the first day” and a myth of creation which has lasted over 150,000 years. The Australian Aborigines are very cognizant of the presence of their “creative ancestors” and their contributions to their tradition. They have rejected many of the values the dominant culture cherishes such as agriculture, architecture, writing, clothing, and the subjugation of animals. Instead of money, the Aborigines cherish kinship, community, and the importance of the law of the Dreamtime. In fact, they  have no concept or word for time or the accumulation of possession.”    Quoted from book review in Sprituality & Practice

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