Posts Tagged ‘St Ethelburgas’

REFLECTIONS ON GRETA THUNBERG’S ABILITY TO SPEAK TRUTH TO POWER By Lewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Article From The St Ethelburgas website:
In recent weeks young people around the world have taken to the streets in their thousands,
placards reading simple truths, “Planet before Profit,” “Our Earth Matters,” Their actions
and words are speaking clearly, of real concern for their future and for the Earth.
They know “There’s no Planet B.”

We are all present at a moment in our shared destiny when the Earth is crying out to us to help
Her in this time of crisis that is destroying Her ecosystem, the fragile web of life that supports
Her multihued unity. Around us are what Thich Nhat Hanh calls the “bells of mindfulness”—
we can hear them ringing in the unprecedented species depletion (such as the recent awareness of
what is called an “insect Armageddon,” with a 45-75% loss of insect biomass), the oceans filling
with plastic at a rate unfathomable a few decades ago, and accelerating climate change; all with
unforeseen consequences. And, on a different level, though just as painful, is the loss of wildness
and wonder, a diminishing sense of the sacred that nourishes our souls.

And together with the young people, many of us are responding with action and ideas, even as our
governments and corporations—with their values focused only on economic growth and materialism
are unable or unwilling to make this a real priority. This was forcefully articulated at
last year’s UN Climate Change COP24 Conference by the 16-year-old activist Greta Thunberg,
who spoke truth to power when she said: “We have not come here to beg world leaders to care.
You have ignored us in the past and you will ignore us again. You only speak of green eternal
economic growth because you are too scared of being unpopular. You only talk about moving
forward with the same bad ideas that got us into this mess, even when the only sensible thing
to do is pull the emergency brake. You are not mature enough to tell it like is.
Even that burden you leave to us children. But I don’t care about being popular.
I care about climate justice and the living planet….”

This last sentence brought tears to my eyes, as my soul heard her speak about real care for
the Earth—for this living, beautiful being who has given us life, who has nourished us with
Her endless generosity, even as we have abused and desecrated Her, raped and pillaged Her
body which our culture regards greedily as just a “resource” for our endless use and abuse.
And since this talk Greta has shown the power of a single person, as she has become an icon,
a catalyst inspiring a growing mass of young people around the world, calling out for the
future of the Earth and their own future, demanding that their voices and the cries of the
Earth be heard.

But behind Greta’s phrase, “the living planet,” is a deeper truth that calls out to our
forgetfulness. As was known to the ancients and to Indigenous peoples, our Earth is a being
with a soul as well as a body, what in the West we called the anima mundi, the soul of the world,
or what the Kogi in the Sierra Nevada in Colombia call Aluna, the spiritual intelligence within
nature. Until we recognize, remember, and reconnect with the spiritual nature of the Earth,
the primal intelligence within all of life, we will be walking in the darkness of our
forgetfulness, unable to find the way to work together with Her, to start to heal and
transform the living oneness to which we all belong.

Every butterfly, every bee, every waterfall, every dream we have, is a part of this living,
spiritual being. She is ancient beyond our understanding, even as She is crying out
at this moment. The great unspoken tragedy of this time is that we have forgotten Her
living sacred presence, and this is the silent censorship that has clear-cut our consciousness.
Our industrialized world has stripped us of our natural relationship, our interbeing with
creation, and now, as the web of life is being torn apart, we do not even know how to respond.
We do not know how to access Her wisdom, how to return to being a part of the great conversation
that belongs to all of life. We remain stranded on the desolate shores of materialism,
as in a supermarket where the shelves are increasingly empty.

Spiritual Activism is an emerging field that calls for a spiritual response to our present
global crisis—to our present social divisiveness and ecological devastation, to our
self-destructive identification with an old story of separation rather than embracing
the living story of life’s interdependent wholeness. Yes, we desperately need to
reduce carbon emissions and pesticides, to stop turning rainforests into ranchland
or palm oil plantations. But there is also a call to reconnect with the sacred
within creation, with the spiritual lifeblood of the planet. Otherwise we will just be
continuing the same one-sided conversation that has caused this devastation.
We need to work together with the Earth, to include Her wonder and wisdom.
We need to reconnect with Her soul.

And this is a work that we each can do—it does not need governments or big organizations,
but individuals whose hearts are open and who have heard the cry of the Earth.
Within our own being we can make this connection, and so help to bring the sacred
alive again in our own daily life and the life of the Earth. There are many different
ways to reconnect, from walking in a sacred manner, to working with the soil with
care in our hands, to including the Earth in our prayers, or simply recognizing divine
presence in the world around us. Whatever our practice or prayer, whatever way we
reaffirm a world of reverence, this foundational work is not complicated,
but rather simply requires our attention, real mindfulness. Then whatever our
outer activities, we are connected to the true nature of the living Earth.
And it can empower us to make a real contribution to enable humanity to rejoin
the great conversation, the sacred relationship with the Earth that was part of
the Original Instructions given to our ancestors.

The Earth will continue. We are now living through the sixth mass extinction of
species in Her history. It is our shared future that is uncertain: whether we will
keep to our ancient promise to witness Her wonder and beauty, honor Her sacred ways;
or whether we will continue our present path, stumbling through an increasingly
soulless wasteland, caught in consumerism, until the sea levels rise, the air becomes too toxic,
the oceans too acidic, our souls too desolate. Again, in the words of the young activist
Greta Thunberg, “We have run out of excuses and we are running out of time.” But she also said,
“Change is coming.” The real question is whether we are open to be a part of real change—for
hearts and hands to help the Earth, for our souls to reconnect with the magic and mystery of
Her living being.

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LOOKING INTO THE ABYSS: Dispair, reconciliation and the Courage to Love by Justine Huxley

Justine is the director of St Ethelburgas Centre for Peace and Reconcilliantion in London and has just published: Generation Y, Spirituality and Social Change

In the last few weeks, we’ve all in our own ways been digesting the news that we have less than 12 years before climate chaos hits.  In the last 7 days, we’ve also been hit with reports that animal populations have been reduced by 60%, that the oceans are significantly warmer than scientists realised, and seen Brazil elect a president who has been described as a ‘global danger’.
It seems we have entered a new phase in our journey of self-destruction, and the ecological and social collapse we have suspected to be on the horizon is now coming to meet us.
The culture of astonishing denial that has pervaded the mainstream has made it almost taboo to talk about such things. The reactions of those unable to face reality can close us down or render it pointless to talk honestly.  But in recent weeks, we sense a sea change: the time for reticence is over.
Mainstream media and also the scientific community for years have been ‘softening’ the facts – always presenting them with relentlessly upbeat messages that we still have time.  The idea is deeply embedded that people must be protected from hopelessness and despair for fear of creating panic or even greater paralysis (Deep Adaptation, Jem Bendell, Cumbria University).  But those messages are now sounding increasingly hollow.  We need to act fast, absolutely, but even if we pull out all the stops, the likelihood is we are going to see more migration, poverty, hunger, conflict and war than we have ever known.
Protecting ourselves from hopelessness no longer serves us.  As many enlightened activists have told us (such as Scilla Elworthy, nominated three times for the Nobel Peace Prize), only if we walk towards the  darkness and not away from it, can we be transformed and be of real service to others or the world.
Many different kinds of responses needed – and I honour those responding with everything from civil disobedience to deepening our relationship with Earth as sacred.  We all need to follow our own hearts prompting.
For me, the theme of reconciliation is naturally to the fore.  I cannot shake off the image of an individual facing a life-threatening illness.  Confronted with a potentially terminal diagnosis, making rapid outer changes in lifestyle is immediate, driven by the determination to live.  But surrendering to the real possibility of death is behind the deeper change – change which could be viewed through the lens of reconciliation.  Reconciliation with our own mortality and with how our individual life has been lived often leads to reconciliation with our family, to making peace with our enemies, and to decisions – made with a sharply awakened consciousness – about which values to live by if time might be limited.
I’ve seen awe-inspiring change made by people in these situations.  I’ve seen people drop grudges and let go of fixed patterns overnight, in a way that seemed almost unbelievable to those around them.  I’ve seen people give up long-held defences and open to the beauty and spontaneity of life. It’s as if a secret reveals itself about what it means to be human.  The seriousness also catapults us beyond the limits of the physical body and into the journey of the soul. Something much bigger than our own individual life makes its presence felt – whether we call that God, or experience it through the power of human love and our existence in a web of  relationship with others.
All this happens when we are brave enough to go beyond denial, to embrace despair and be changed by it.  And miracles are possible in this space – miracles that include but are not limited to physical recovery.
Sitting with this theme of reconciliation, I feel a call to reach inward – to ask my own heart how I can love more fearlessly – not just those close to me, but our whole human family and those around the world whose lives are already being torn apart.  How can I allow my heart to be broken by it all – by the beauty of what we are destroying, by the melody of a solitary blackbird, or by those pregnant moments before first light, as a dark winter night awakens into day. How can I live the knowledge that mystery is present even in the midst of what is falling apart?
I also feel a call to reach outwards –  to colleagues, activists and spiritual companions – to make space for retreat and discernment.  Not to give up on outer action, but to explore in parallel this inner work of reconciliation and see if we can source the resilience that comes only from being in touch with the depths.  How can we prepare honestly for what is coming? How can we act with integrity, and keep acting from that place, even on the days when it all seems futile?  How can we meet this with the full depth of our spirituality – with both the ferocious passion and the ruthless inner detachment that real service demands?
To those willing to look into the abyss – may our love and connection with each other and with Earth make this a time of meaning –  and sustain us in the times to come.

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